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This week’s PMQs: “quite possibly the day when Tories started taking Jeremy Corbyn seriously”

pmq cameron osborne

As Glasgow’s Daily Record put it: “Cameron had no good answers and looked like a PM finally being held to account for the all damage his policies are doing. It really was an absolutely terrible day at the office for David Cameron. And quite possibly the day when Tories started taking Jeremy Corbyn seriously”.

As even the right-wing press salutes Jeremy Corbyn’s questions in Wednesday’s PMQs, two of the Telegraph’s journalists – hopefully their worst – pounce.

  • One is Dan Hodges, who describes himself as a ‘tribal neo-Blairite’.

dan hodgesDan has been a parliamentary researcher, a Labour Party official, GMB official, and as director of communications for Transport for London under Ken Livingstone. He left the party in 2013 after the government lost a crucial vote in the House of Commons which was designed to pave the way for a military intervention in Syria. Nice guy.

He writes: “The Lords are in open revolt. Caesar has been brought low. Or George Osborne, who has a haircut remarkably similar to Caesar’s, has been brought low. The barbarians are at the gates. Jeremy Corbyn has finally had a decent PMQs, using the tax credits issue to back David Cameron into a corner”.

He later refers to “Jeremy Corbyn’s besting of David Cameron at PMQs”

Reading around one gathers his attempted ‘downing’ of Osborne and Cameron is due to his support for Boris Johnson, first shown when he voted for him in the London Mayoral elections.

  • The other is Angela Epstein, a columnist for the Jewish Chronicle and some right-wing British publications

angela epsteinUnder the title, ‘Jeremy Corbyn is too thick to be Prime Minister’, she focusses on his exam results and lack of what she calls ‘natural talent’. It appears that she is a person whose disapproval amounts to an accolade. Read this devastating analysis of her mindset by Kate Smurthwaite, comedian.

Attacks by such people only highlight Corbyn’s decency and the popular welcome for the Labour Party’s policies for building a fairer society and redeeming Britain’s besmirched international reputation.

Compare Jeremy Corbyn’s record with that of the many ‘highly educated’ psychopaths in and out of power. They have successfully connived at the deaths and destruction in so many countries of late – whilst increasing their fortunes by their alliance with subsidised arms traders, multinationals who have taken over most of Britain’s energy, health, water, financial, communications and transport services and those who periodically attempt to make the struggling taxpayer accept mass medication (fluoride, statins, the polypill) GM technology, nuclear power stations, polluting incinerators and fracking – totally disregarding the welfare of the 99%.

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As pressure to use Merck and Pfizer statins increases, concern about links between the lobbying industry and government quango intensifies

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SHCA headerAs concern about mass-medication with statins is in the news, Theresa draws our attention to an article highlighting the fact that the Specialised Healthcare Alliance (SHCA), a lobbying company working for some of the world’s biggest drugs and medical equipment firms, has written a draft report for NHS England, a government quango.

Senior MPs have suggested that this report, which could help shape future health policy, shows that the medical industry is able to use its “wealth to influence government policy at will”. One has called for a parliamentary debate.

Potential conflicts of interest

sarah wollaston mp mdSarah Wollaston (right), a former GP and member of the House of Commons Health Select Committee, said: “NHS England is increasingly commissioning vast sums of public money and we need to know who is getting invited to sit on what panels and what potential conflicts of interest they might have.”

As Tamasin Cave, of the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency, added: “(T)he pharmaceuticals industry is a formidable lobbyist with unrivalled access to policy-makers and significant influence.”

The SHCA, established in 2003 to campaign on behalf of people with rare diseases and other complex conditions which require specialised medical care, has a membership of 97 patient-related organisations. It is supported by 13 corporate members. Its costs are paid for by 13 drug companies, all of whom pay £12,000 a year. Secretariat services to SHCA are provided by a lobbying company called JMC Partners, whose clients include blue-chip drugs firms such as Novatis, Astro Zenica, Sanofi and Pfizer. It also represents a number of medical device manufacturers and biotech companies who sell their products to the NHS, including Roche Diagnostics, Cyberonics and Bausch & Lomb.

The author of the article, Patrick Wright, says that the findings raise significant questions about links between the lobbying industry and NHS England – a quango set up to run the NHS under the Government’s health reforms.

Read the article here: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/revealed-big-pharma-links-to-nhs-policy-with-senior-mps-saying-medical-industry-uses-wealth-to-influence-government-9120187.html?utm_source=indynewsletter&utm_medium=email11022014

Statins: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10632047/Statins-12-million-Brits-will-be-advised-to-take-cholesterol-lowering-drug.html

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