Blog Archives

MSM fails to mention the crowds who turn out to hear Jeremy Corbyn

Below in Broxstowe last weekend


 

And young supporters are also not swayed by media, career-minded ‘independents’ and deputy leader

 

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said:

“I’ve had a very interesting week in politics. I’m obviously very sad at some of the things that have happened and very sad at some of the things that have been said. Walking away from our movement achieves nothing. Not understanding where we have come from is a bad mistake.

“Because when people come together in a grouping, in a community like the Labour Party, there’s nothing we can’t achieve together for everybody . . .

“Labour, for me, is my life – and I’m very sad at people who have left our party. I really am. I say this to them: in June 2017, I was elected on a manifesto, Emily was elected on a manifesto, Richard was elected on a manifesto, Gloria was elected on a manifesto – it was the same manifesto . . . the Labour Party believes in equality and justice, that is what was the centre of our manifesto, and that will be at the centre of our next manifesto . . .

“When the media talk about the bravery of those who walked away, Anna Soubry voted for austerity and said it was a good thing. Almost immediately after leaving Chris Leslie tells us that we should not be ending university fees … and we should be cutting corporation tax and increasing the burden on others.

Mr Corbyn also addressed the anti-Semitism issues within the party, which MPs Luciana Berger and Joan Ryan both cited as they quit Labour this week:

“When people are racist to each other, then we oppose it in any way whatsoever. If anyone is racist towards anyone else in our party – wrong. Out of court, out of order, totally and absolutely unacceptable. Anti-Semitism is unacceptable in any form and in any way whatsoever, and anywhere in our society.”

He added: “I’m proud to lead a party that was the first ever to introduce race relations legislation and also to pass the equality act and the human rights act into the statute book.”

 

 

 

o

Have serving MPs from the Cabinet of 2003 the moral right to represent their constituents following such poor judgement and its consequences?

An article on a Jamaican blog ends: “As we digest the contents and impact of Chilcot’s report, I am reminded of the late Brian Haw (1949-2011) who lived in front of the Houses of Parliament for almost 10 years protesting against the Iraq War”.

 

brian haw

The late Brian Haw

African Herbsman writes: “One of the sad aspects of the Chilcot report is that most of its contents was known at the time leading up to the Iraq War in 2003, through Whitehall & various media sources – e.g. Govt leaks, Private Eye magazine and documentaries made by Panorama and Dispatches”. He continues:

“That is why –  with the exception of the late Robin Cook – Tony Blair’s cabinet of 2002-3 must also shoulder blame for their support for the war. Former cabinet ministers such as Jack Straw, Jack Cunningham, David Blunkett, Margaret Beckett, Stephen Byers, Geoff Hoon and Deputy PM John Prescott are as culpable as Tony Blair”.

Now some of those ex-ministers are expressing various forms of denial, but the author is unrelenting: “Today, say they didn’t have all the facts or felt shut out by Tony Blair at the time. Yet these ministers voted to commit young men and women to an illegal war. Unforgivable”.

African Herbsman, who formerly worked in Whitehall continues:

“These cabinet and backbench Labour MPs voted for war only to boost their career prospects within the government. Gordon Brown was told bluntly that if he did not publicly support the war he would not succeed Tony Blair as PM.

“Today, almost 70 of those Labour MPs who voted in 2003 are still in the House of Commons.  Yet most of them have said little about Chilcot’s report or even apologised for their selfish act. The majority of whom are plotting the bring the current leader Jeremy Corbyn down via Angela Eagle – who voted for the war.

“Some Labour MPs did their devious best to block the setting up of the Chilcot Inquiry. Some tried restricting the Inquiry’s terms of reference and even delay the report’s release.

“Do any of those MPs have the moral right to represent their constituents following such poor judgement and its consequences?

“Friday morning 2 May 1997, was one of the happiest days to be in London. The sun was out and Labour had defeated John Major’s Tory government the night before. We couldn’t believe that for some of us we were witnessing a Labour government in our adult lives. But Tony Blair, his cabinet colleagues, his inner circle and pro-war backbench MPs just blew the goodwill they were given to make the UK a proud, honest and prosperous society”.

 

 

Read the article here: https://wingswithme.wordpress.com/2016/07/10/chilcot-report-dont-just-blame-blair/

 

 

 

Sanders and Corbyn: sounds familiar. Next?

99%-3

In Canada, Britain, Greece, Italy and Spain, ‘a sense of revulsion at the political elite’ is leading a popular vote for those seen as trustworthy candidates, who care for the 99%.

In the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary, Senator Bernie Sanders has gained 60% of the vote, compared with Hillary Clinton’s 38%. As noted earlier on this site, Sanders has a Corbyn-like appeal for younger voters and is attracting far larger audiences than expected. He has assembled an online fundraising operation and ‘electrified’ the youth vote with promises of a “political revolution” that would bring Scandinavian-type policies to the US.

bernie 2 sandersThe Times reports that, in a speech to his supporters after the contest, Mr Sanders said the result marked a new era, adding: “What the people here have said is that given the enormous crises facing our country, it is just too late for the same old, same old establishment politics and establishment economics”. 

“A message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington”

Sanders’ message that that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their Super PACs [political action committees] and that the economy is rigged in favour of a “billionaire class” struck a chord among New Hampshire voters who did not trust Mrs Clinton and her ties to Wall Street, reference being made to the “1%”.

According to exit polls, income inequality and jobs – two central themes of the Sanders campaign – were the top issues for Democrat voters. More than half said they were dissatisfied with the current state of politics.  Just as people in Britian cared more about a candidate’s trustworthiness than about experience or electability, the same ranking of priorities has favoured Bernie Sanders.

Corbyn and Sanders offer the hope of peace and justice to a divided people, currently exploited by the wealthy 1%.

Austerity 2: Corbyn “spending cuts would not be needed if big companies paid their tax”

hmrc header

Parliament’s own website heads the summary of the Committee of Public Accounts report on Revenue and Customs: “HMRC still failing UK taxpayers”.

Its lamentable performance in simple tasks such as answering the telephone is on record and its failure to collect a reasonable amount of offshore tax evaded was published in November. It spoke of 11,000 job cuts since 2010 & 40,000 since 2004. Read the summary by the chair, MP Meg Hillier, here: http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/public-accounts-committee/news-parliament-2015/hmrc-performance-report-published-15-16/

“HMRC must do more to ensure all due tax is paid. The public purse is missing out and taxpayers expect and deserve better.

“We are deeply disappointed at the low number of prosecutions by HMRC for tax evasion. We believe it is important for HMRC to send a clear message to those who seek to evade tax that the penalties will be severe and public. It’s also important that the majority who play by the rules, paying their tax on time and in full, see that those who don’t will face the consequences.

“Tax avoidance also remains a serious concern. Too many avoidance schemes run rings around the taxman, operating legally but gaining advantages never intended by Parliament. If tax law is to be improved then HMRC must as a priority provide Parliament with comprehensive details of avoidance. HMRC must also rapidly improve its customer service, previously described by the PAC as abysmal and now even worse – to the extent it could be considered a genuine threat to tax collection.

“It beggars belief that, having made disappointing progress on tax evasion and avoidance, the taxman also seems incapable of running a satisfactory service for people trying to pay their fair share.”

crickhowell 3

The FT reports that people of Crickhowell agree: the town’s traders have submitted tax plans to HMRC, using offshore arrangements favoured by multinationals. They hope that their ‘tax rebellion’ will spread to other towns forcing the Government to tackle how Amazon, for example, paid £11.9million tax last year on £5.3billion of UK sales. Their rationale: High street coffee shop owner Steve said: ‘I have always paid every penny of tax I owe, and I don’t object to that. What I object to is paying my full tax when my big name competitors are doing the damnedest to dodge theirs.’

Media 49: first borough council by-election Corbyn-era success, mainstream press balked

Not before the children

David Carr: If Labour had lost this would have been all over the news!

chorley 1 resulthttp://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showthread.php?p=80178693

Comment on that site:

Nice job from the unelectable”

Euxton North (Chorley) is a key marginal between Labour and the Conservatives, has been one of the more reliable bellwether seats in the country, having been won by the party that went on to form the government in every election since 1964.

The three candidates hoping to win the seat on Chorley Council were Tommy Gray (Labour), Alan Platt (Conservative) and Christopher Suart (UK Independence Party).

Comments on https://twitter.com/JeremyCorbyn4PM

Dr Alan Maddison ‏@alanmaddison20  19h19 hours ago

@MoAkram8 @JeremyCorbyn4PM This is really encouraging.

Mo Akram ‏@MoAkram8  19h19 hours ago

@alanmaddison20 @JeremyCorbyn4PM It is a GREAT result considering the biased anti Corbyn onslaught by the mainstream media!

David Carr @BeGoodBeBrave  13h13 hours ago

@john1genius @MoAkram8 @JeremyCorbyn4PM If Labour had lost this would have been all over the news!

David Carr ‏@BeGoodBeBrave  13h13 hours ago

@john1genius @MoAkram8 @JeremyCorbyn4PM BBC becoming crude propaganda arm of the Tory Government. Imagine if Labour had lost this election.

And off subject but so neat: JeremyCorbyn4PM Retweeted: BBC Question Time ‏@bbcquestiontime  Oct 29

.@billybragg It shouldn’t be socialism for the bankers and capitalism for the steel workers. #bbcqt

Last word from UK Polling Report site:

chorley comment

Who is driving the Financial Times to desperation – Corbyn, or vested interests?

As condemnation mounts, more people rally to support Jeremy Corbyn. Very slow to rouse, has the need for a wholesale rescue finally taken hold of British hearts and minds? Will this movement grow and prosper, resurrecting what has been called ‘the Dunkirk spirit’ (Macmillan) in the face of a government dominated by wealthy interests?

jeremy corbynFT View, which never names its author, felt the need to open its article with a savage caricature of Jeremy Corbyn. It was decided not to reproduce it, but stay with the reality (right).

The title given: ‘Jeremy Corbyn means trouble, and not just for UK’s Labour party‘.

Subtitle: ‘Victory for the radical would cause problems for Britain’s body politic’.

But Britain’s corporate ruled body politic is already in deep trouble

broken britain 3 mps bankersOne comment on the article describes the country asa country where the gross distortions of hot and corrupt money and the encouragement of it by successive governments have led to a sense of despondency in voters”.

As FT View says, the young idealists and trade union members who support Corbyn “aim for a full-throated protest movement against fiscal austerity and “neoliberalism”. They are redefining the purpose of politics”. Not before time. Another comment:

“The sheer lack of humanity and care for the most vulnerable of people has finally lit a touchpaper in the country.  Good”.

The FT continues: “Even if Mr Corbyn narrowly loses out to Yvette Cooper, the leadership rival who finally spoke out against him on Thursday, the sheer scale of his following would drag her to the left”. . .

And provide a real opposition, then a government serving its electorate, after years of plutocracy?

Mr Corbyn’s decent constructive economic policies are dismissed as “quaint” – shareholders in privatised postal services, transport and utilities no doubt would use stronger language. His outlook on foreign policy is deemed “troubling” – especially to the arms industry.

The next comment sets FT View right:

JC ft comment

But the FT View writer ends: “Folly upon folly has brought a grand political party to this predicament, from which it is not certain to recover. That would be bad enough. The potential harm to the rest of British public life is just as worrying”. Yes . . .the signs are that many more might ‘worryingly’ start taking a real interest in politics and become immune to media brainwashing.

99%-3

A true socialist government would care for the 99%.

 Britain might even become honest, compassionate, egalitarian and respected.

 

The human race has one really effective weapon, said Mark Twain — “and that is laughter”

Last June, investigative journalist, Felicity Arbuthnot, sent a link to an article by André Vltchek, novelist, investigative journalist, filmmaker and playwright, who reflected that no revelation, no discovery of crimes committed by Western governments and companies leads men and women to demand the immediate resignations of their governments, or the changing of their entire political and economic system.

We add that mainstream mass media misleads the public by sidelining the important and focussing on the trivial:

media trivia

Vltchek continues: “We write and write, film and talk… Huge accusations are made, crimes confirmed… But again: nothing happens!

In a reply to Felicity – strengthened yesterday by Edward Luce’s Financial Times article – I suggested that only humour remains: the revelation that the Emperor has no new clothes, no honesty and no humane feeling.Broken BritainThe reply was accompanied by a collection of cartoons – the best about Britain was by Ingram Pinn – above – but it only reaches a limited audience; ‘saturation coverage’ is needed for a significant impact.

In the FT on Sunday, Luce referred to a ‘potent intervention’ from comedian John Oliver, whose use of the Monopoly board game illustrated the industry’s stranglehold on internet speeds and prompted 4m viewers to jam Washington with complaints. He marvels that:

“Far from catering to our shrinking attention, the comedy shows demand as much of their audience as the most ponderous news channels. Mr Oliver employs four full-time researchers, including two former New York Times journalists. His segments go for 20 minutes between breaks and contain more data than, say, an hour of CNN”.

Luce attributes the increased audience for humour to a collapsing or ‘cratering’ public trust in authority, as few institutions are unscathed in America, or we add, Britain:

  • rising distrust has engulfed the marbled pillars of Congress
  • the Supreme Court
  • the media,
  • the Boy Scouts,
  • corporate America,
  • the Catholic Church and so on.

He expresses two easily challenged reservations about ‘the comedic reach’: it is left leaning, so? And it has no answer to terrorist states that incinerate people (presumably not a reference to CIA drone strikes) stating that only politics can solve such problems.

But the fact is that state politics are totally failing to provide solutions. Could cartoonists and comedians do any worse?

GWhoax (1)

This one certainly presented an agenda and had an irrefutable answer to  critics.