Blog Archives

Elite stranglehold on Britain – unbreakable?

As Steve Beauchampé writes in the Birmingham Press and Political Concern, generations of an elite have ruled this nation (with a few intermissions) for as long as anyone can remember, due to a rigged electoral system.

Their dual achievements:

  • comfortable tax arrangements for the few, a political/corporate nexus which ensures highly paid and nominal duties for all in the inner circle
  • vast military expenditure bestowed on the arms industry, as rising numbers of the population survive in relative poverty, wait in hospital corridors, receive a sub-standard education and depend on handouts to eke out their existence.

Direction of travel

Beauchampé:(The) economy is increasingly kept afloat by the economic support of China . . . The modern high-rise residential blocks that have sprung up throughout the capital may give the impression of a modern, flourishing economy, but look closely and you will see that many are all but empty, whilst homelessness and a reliance on subsistence level housing grows . . . “He notes that surveillance is at an historic high with spy cameras, and even microphones installed in many public places -describing the state’s ability to track the population and follow their activities and conversations as ‘frightening’. . .

The elite stranglehold could be broken

OB’s editor agrees with many that electoral reform is a priority for beneficial change – but even under the rigged ‘first past the post’ system, if the weary mass of people (Brenda of Bristol)  saw the true situation they would vote for the candidate with a credible track record who would be most likely to work for the common good.

 

 

 

 

Government cuts for disabled people escalate

The recent by-elections gave cover for the latest government announcement of emergency legislation inflicting further cuts on disabled people – ‘a good day to bury bad news’.

Two tribunals had ruled that the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) should expand the reach of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) – which helps disabled people fund their living costs.

  • One ruling found that someone who needed support at home to take medication or monitor a health condition like diabetes would score the same on the benefits criteria as people who needed help with a demanding procedure such as kidney dialysis.
  • A second ruling said people who struggled to travel independently because of conditions such as anxiety scored the same as someone who was, for example, blind.

Ministers then swiftly revised the law to deny the increased benefit payments to more than 150,000 people.

super-rich-bailout

A Lib Dem work and pensions spokeswoman said it was outrageous that the government was using the ruling to make matters worse for disabled people: “What makes things even worse is that they have sneaked this announcement out under the cover of [Thursday’s] by-elections.”

From April, it is reported that new claimants will see a reduction of £29.05 in their entitlement, which will fall to £73.10 a week. This follows on from the cuts that the DWP tried to implement last year, which resulted in Iain Duncan Smith’s resignation.

Liz Sayce from Disability Rights UK said: “We’re not aware of one single disability employment or benefits expert who thinks this particular cut will be an incentive for disabled people to get a job.”

Unfortunately this logic, and a host of scathing comments seen in the Metro won’t pierce the thick skins of affluent legislators and further deprivation will hit the least fortunate in many sectors.

 

 

 

This week’s PMQs: “quite possibly the day when Tories started taking Jeremy Corbyn seriously”

pmq cameron osborne

As Glasgow’s Daily Record put it: “Cameron had no good answers and looked like a PM finally being held to account for the all damage his policies are doing. It really was an absolutely terrible day at the office for David Cameron. And quite possibly the day when Tories started taking Jeremy Corbyn seriously”.

As even the right-wing press salutes Jeremy Corbyn’s questions in Wednesday’s PMQs, two of the Telegraph’s journalists – hopefully their worst – pounce.

  • One is Dan Hodges, who describes himself as a ‘tribal neo-Blairite’.

dan hodgesDan has been a parliamentary researcher, a Labour Party official, GMB official, and as director of communications for Transport for London under Ken Livingstone. He left the party in 2013 after the government lost a crucial vote in the House of Commons which was designed to pave the way for a military intervention in Syria. Nice guy.

He writes: “The Lords are in open revolt. Caesar has been brought low. Or George Osborne, who has a haircut remarkably similar to Caesar’s, has been brought low. The barbarians are at the gates. Jeremy Corbyn has finally had a decent PMQs, using the tax credits issue to back David Cameron into a corner”.

He later refers to “Jeremy Corbyn’s besting of David Cameron at PMQs”

Reading around one gathers his attempted ‘downing’ of Osborne and Cameron is due to his support for Boris Johnson, first shown when he voted for him in the London Mayoral elections.

  • The other is Angela Epstein, a columnist for the Jewish Chronicle and some right-wing British publications

angela epsteinUnder the title, ‘Jeremy Corbyn is too thick to be Prime Minister’, she focusses on his exam results and lack of what she calls ‘natural talent’. It appears that she is a person whose disapproval amounts to an accolade. Read this devastating analysis of her mindset by Kate Smurthwaite, comedian.

Attacks by such people only highlight Corbyn’s decency and the popular welcome for the Labour Party’s policies for building a fairer society and redeeming Britain’s besmirched international reputation.

Compare Jeremy Corbyn’s record with that of the many ‘highly educated’ psychopaths in and out of power. They have successfully connived at the deaths and destruction in so many countries of late – whilst increasing their fortunes by their alliance with subsidised arms traders, multinationals who have taken over most of Britain’s energy, health, water, financial, communications and transport services and those who periodically attempt to make the struggling taxpayer accept mass medication (fluoride, statins, the polypill) GM technology, nuclear power stations, polluting incinerators and fracking – totally disregarding the welfare of the 99%.