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Assisted Dying 5: Is government colluding with industry to ensure that maximum profit is extracted from the cradle to the grave?

Are frail or elderly Britons kept alive, against their will, to boost industry profits?

Like most people polled in Britain, BBC Online reports that Anna Soubry, newly appointed Under-Secretary of State for Health, thinks that the law needs to “evolve” to allow people to die at home – self-assisted dying not medical euthanasia.

Liberal Democrat Norman Lamb, who was also appointed as a health minister in the reshuffle, said there was a case “for looking at reform”: “I certainly think that we should debate it.”

Is beneficial reform being delayed due to the corporate lobbying of the huge and influential ‘health’ industry which needs the frail & elderly – and their families – to live and pay as long as possible?

Assisted dying and/or euthanasia is legal in Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Columbia and three American states: Oregon, Washington, and Montana.

This corporate political nexus pervades every corner and stage of our lives

Evidence of this is regularly published on this website. The most recent example reported today is the thousands of pounds donations from a major shareholder in America’s Domino’s Pizza company given to Education Secretary Michael Gove’s constituency party. Channel 4’s Dispatches identified a disturbing new trend for fast food chains like Domino’s to open premises close to schools.

Time for change!

 

 

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Tony Nicklinson is now at peace; how many more people will be forced to suffer?

Tried and tested

Assisted-suicide and/or euthanasia is legal in Columbia, Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Switzerland and three American states: Oregon, Washington, and Montana.

Tony Nicklinson, who was paralysed from the neck down following a stroke in 2005, died peacefully today of natural causes.

He wanted the right to die yet was unable to take his own life or take a cocktail of lethal drugs prepared for him.

High Court judges ruled the issue was for Parliament to decide; knowing that, why did they admit the case?

Mr Nicklinson said he was “devastated” by the decision – in an article he wrote for the BBC, he had described his life as “a living nightmare”.

Tony Nicklinson and so many others could have been spared physical and mental torment.