Assisted Dying 12 : Change the laws in England and Wales

There have been years of positive evidence in seven countries and six American states which legalised assisted dying or euthanasia. Despite this and the support of over 80% of people polled in Britain, the BBC reports that Lord Justice Sales, Mrs Justice Whipple and Mr Justice Garnham rejected the claim of Noel Conway (left) who has motor neurone disease and wants a doctor to be allowed to prescribe a lethal dose when his health deteriorates.

 He argued that when he had less than six months to live and retained the mental capacity to make the decision, he wished to be able to enlist assistance from the medical profession to bring about a “peaceful and dignified” death, saying goodbye to family and friends at the right time and in the right condition.

As Saimo Chahal QC, partner and joint head of the International law and public law & Human Rights departments of Bindmans LLP, recently wrote, the debate on legalising assisted dying has been going on for decades in the UK, though polls dating back to the 1970s show that a majority of Britons wish to decide on the time and manner of their own death.

Noel and several others have gone to court hoping to bring about a change in the law. Diane Pretty, a woman suffering from motor neurone disease, sought immunity from prosecution for her husband so he could assist her to die.

The European Court of Human Rights in 2002 found: “In an era of growing medical sophistication combined with longer life expectancies, many people are concerned that they should not be forced to linger on in old age or in states of advanced physical or mental decrepitude which conflict with strongly held ideas of self and personal identity.”

Debbie Purdy, Tony Nicklinson and Paul Lamb also took legal action. The Supreme Court in June 2014 found that their European Convention on Human Rights article 8 rights were engaged, that the court did have jurisdiction to decide Paul’s case but that parliament should have the opportunity to review the law first. Ms Chahal (right) continues:

“Now, a new case is before the High Court, that of Omid, a 54-year-old man, who was diagnosed with multiple systems atrophy in 2014, a condition that cannot be cured and affects the nervous system. He attempted suicide in 2015, failed like so many others, and was then moved to a nursing home. Even with 24-hour care and support, Omid wants to die as he feels that he has no quality of life. Omid wants to change the assisted dying law in England and Wales – a courageous and selfless act considering his condition. He wants to help others and to leave a legacy. . .

“Omid is not terminally ill but has several years to live in this deplorable condition. Previous failed attempts to change the assisted dying laws through parliament restricted access to assisted dying to terminally ill people with six months or less to live. There is no moral or legal basis for such a restriction and it would not assist Omid and many others like him who have incurable conditions.

Since 2002, 377 Britons have travelled to DIGNITAS in Switzerland to have an accompanied suicide. Many people in England and Wales consider that the law is unfair and unjust in failing to provide accompanied suicide at home.

Read the article by Saimo Chahal here.

 

 

 

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Posted on October 6, 2017, in Government, Health, Legal issues and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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