Trident: hubris or pragmatism?

Persisting with an American Trident replacement in order to retain a permanent Security Council seat, is to reject pragmatism in favour of la gloire . . .

So says a letter in the Financial Times today, pointing out that “The nearest thing nowadays to a Potemkin village is Britain’s so-called independent nuclear deterrent”.

potemkin village

Blessed Wikipedia came to this writer’s aid: the phrase Potemkin Village was originally used to describe a fake portable village, built only to impress; it is now used, typically in politics and economics, to describe any construction (literal or figurative) built solely to deceive others into thinking that some situation is better than it really is.

The letter continues: “Yet it is potent enough to blow the Labour Party apart. To treat it as a job-preservation scheme — as do as do some trade unionists — is to go from the sublime to the ridiculous.

“Questions concerning control of Trident are inseparable from the decision to use a missile delivery system designed, manufactured and overhauled in the US.

“Even submarine-launched test firings are conducted in American waters near Cape Canaveral under, needless to say, US Navy supervision.

“It would have been irresponsible of President John F Kennedy to have agreed to supply missiles that didn’t incorporate an electronic lock mechanism. A desperate Harold Macmillan was easily fobbed off. It is inconceivable that Number 10 would fire Trident in anger without prior approval from the White House.

trident2

The writer ended: “Persisting with Trident and its proposed replacement in order to retain a permanent Security Council seat is to reject British pragmatism in favour of la gloire . . . “


Taken from letter written by Yugo Kovach: Winterborne Houghton, Dorset, UK

 

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Posted on January 26, 2016, in Arms trade, Conflict of interest, Corporate political nexus, Democracy undermined, Economy, Finance, Foreign policy, Government, Military matters, Parliamentary failure, Planning, Vested interests and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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