Britain’s government: “of the rich, by the rich, for the rich”

A reader sent this link to an article by John Wight – well worth reading in full – which crystallises the writer’s unease at the difference between HMRC’s treatment of poor tax or benefit defaulters and its leniency to the very rich.

As he writes: “The sheer scale of tax evasion on the part of the rich in the UK is staggering . . . in 2014 more than £80billion was lost to the Exchequer as a result of tax evasion in 2014 . . .

“At the other end of the social spectrum benefit fraud costs just over £1billion each year . . .”

Mr Wight refers to a two tier system of justice:

  • Those found guilty of benefit fraud are maligned, shamed, and demonised.
  • The rich found guilty of tax fraud are allowed to avoid the inconvenience of prosecution and court in return for an undisclosed pay off.

benefit-fraud-cartoon

And adds that “more damning evidence of the extent to which the rich are ‘getting away with it’ is provided by the fact that despite the mammoth difference in cost to the UK taxpayer the resources that have been deployed to crack down on benefit fraud are exponentially more than tax evasion”.

His overview:

“We have in Britain a government of the rich, by the rich, and for the rich, the consequences of which are tangible. With the advent of the worst economic crisis since the 1930s, caused by the greed and recklessness of the banks, the government has effected the transference of wealth from the poor to the rich under the rubric of austerity, a process measured in food banks, payday loans, benefit sanctions, the bedroom tax, and zero hours contracts at one end of the social and economic spectrum, alongside an increase in the wealth of the country’s 1000 richest people over the same period”.

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Posted on February 16, 2015, in Conflict of interest, Corporate political nexus, Democracy undermined, Economy, Finance, Government, Lobbying, Parliamentary failure, Planning, Public relations, Reward for failure, Taxpayers' money, Vested interests and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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