Government: are share prices, lucrative consultancies and directorships more important than justice & food security?

Farmers’ lives are being shortened to give company shareholders, high flying consultants and industry leaders a substantial income and maximise corporate profits

andrew hemming on protest 2

 

A dairy farmer writes about the death of Andrew Hemming, vice-chairman of Farmers for Action:

This is so sad, I heard him speak at a few protests and meetings he attended in our area and he came over as caring, dedicated to our cause, and inspirational. I am truly sorry that his life has been cut short at such an early age and send his family my heartfelt sympathy.

I fear the same for members of other equally dedicated and caring farming families who are also fighting desperately for survival. They also may be shortening their lives by working far harder than is reasonable, or safe for their health, just in order to feed animals, meet bills and survive in a ruthlessly competitive target driven industry where maximising profit is considered by some as more important than people or animals, and for what?

To give company shareholders, high flying consultants and industry leaders a substantial income and maximise corporate profits?

All we ask is control of our own destiny by earning a fair and honest living from the land we are responsible for, with income derived from producing a good source of staple food that people need, and to leave a realistic and sustainable future for our families and communities, which is what Andrew was working so hard to achieve.

We do not want this continual conflict, and I am certain that Andrew didn’t

It is 2 years since Asda wielded their massive financial power to intimidate Andrew, David Handley and the other FFA regional coordinators by taking them to court.

Their crime was to help secure a fair price for our milk, which we are still seeking.
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Posted on December 22, 2012, in Civil servants, Conflict of interest, Corporate political nexus, Government, Vested interests and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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